Courses

Fri, 2017-10-20 09:29 -- tas3y

Latin American Studies

Fall 2021

 

NOTE: Courses listed here or in the Undergraduate Record will count towards a Latin American Studies major or minor. Prior approval for other course work must be granted before the course is taken. For approval, please contact the Director of the Latin American Studies program, Eli Carter at elc6b@virginia.edu. Please be sure to include a copy of the syllabus.

 

ANTH 3589:  Pre-Columbian South America                                     Sonia Alconini

Department:     Anthropology

Day and Time:   TuTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm

Description: This course will review the history of South America from its earliest population to the Spanish Conquest. Emphasis will be placed on tracing the rise of civilization in the Andes. The Inka empire was only the last of a long sequence of states and empires. Comparison of the Inka state with earlier polities such as the Moche and Tiwanaku will reveal the unique and enduring traditions of Andean political organizations.

HILA 1501:  The Great Encounter                                                         Brian Owensby

Department:     History

Day and Time:   Tu 2:30pm – 4:30pm

The Great Encounter is a history of Latin America from 1492. The “Encounter” refers to the coming together of Indigenous peoples, Europeans, and Africans in the context of the New World. The “Great” refers to the world-historical significance of this convergence. The course is topical and thematic, rather than strictly chronological. Among other topics, we will discuss: the crisis of “knowing” among Europeans occasioned by the Encounter; the ethics of encountering the “other”; how people conceive of their identities and belongings in contexts of uncertainty; the role of Indigenous peoples and Africans in the making of the modern world; race, racial thinking, and racial identities from a Latin American perspective. This first-and-second-year seminar will focus closely on honing the skills necessary for future reading-and-writing intensive courses. We will also practice crafting a conversation and disagreeing productively.

HILA 1501:  Race and State in Mexico                                                Sweeney

Department:     History

Day and Time:  

Who or what defines “race”? How does that change over time, and what does it have to do with politics? In what way have politicians, feminist movements, institutions, communities, artists and schools used popularly held concepts of race to shape efforts towards repression and exclusion of others as well for community empowerment and social reform? If in the colonial period the authorities of what was to be the Mexican Republic attempted to clearly delineate difference by “race” and use those perceived differences to impose physical, legal, and economic categories of personhood, in the national period these differences would have to be erased if the Constitution’s supposed legal equality was to be upheld. Yet movements asserting specifically Indigenous demands took place throughout the nineteenth century, and by the end of that period scientific notions of race were informing oppressive laws targeting the social and political control of predominantly dark-skinned and Indigenous peoples. The Mexican Revolution’s conflicting cultural consequences, praising the “cosmic” mestizo “race” on one hand and an institutionalized “indigenismo” on the other, melded with Mexico’s insertion into an international cultural market in which U.S. imperialism and imported fascisms reinforced anti-Black sentiment even as Afro-influenced musical and dance cultures became more popular. Linking this backdrop to the rise of tourism and academic reconceptualizations of race; to Zapatismo, Indigenous women’s fights for cultural and political rights; Black Mexicans’ struggle with cultural visibility; and race-based demands for environmental rights and sustainability, this class looks at race and politics in Mexico broadly, while highlighting particular case studies. Rather than defining race itself, students are asked to analyze the role the concept of race has played across time and place in Mexican history, with an eye to the constant global flows of ideas, cultures and peoples that shaped Mexico’s history of racial politics.

HILA 2002:   Modern Latin American, 1824 to Present                  Thomas Klubock

Department:     History

Day and Time:  

This course examines modern Latin American history from independence to the present. It focuses on socioeconomic, cultural, and political changes, and on how different social groups -peasants, indigenous people, workers, and women- have experienced these changes. We will consider a number of key questions about the causes of underdevelopment, the roots of authoritarianism, the nature and causes of revolutionary movements, the question of human rights, the problem of social inequality, United States imperialism, and the role of the Catholic Church in Latin America. Requirements for the course are two in-class midterm exams (20% of final grade each) and a final exam (35% of final grade). The three exams will be closed-book and students will write five paragraph-long analyses of key terms, names, or phrases for the midterms and ten for the final exam. Students will be graded on their mastery of material from the assigned readings, lectures, and discussion sections. In addition, attendance and active participation in section discussions are required and will be factored into the final grade (25% of final grade). Students will read on average 100-125 pages per week. Reading assignments must be completed before discussion sections.

HILA 3111:   Public Life in Modern Latin America                           Herbert Braun

Department:     History

Day and Time:   T/TH 8:00-9:15AM

HILA 3051:   Modern Central America                                             Lean Sweeney

Department:     History

Day and Time:  T/TH, 12:30-1:45pm

Central America has come to the notice of many as a place of high crime and violence, and the origin of the United States' current "immigration problem."  This course aims to complicate that understanding of both Central America and its relationship with the rest of the world through analyzing Central American history, culture, and politics through a transnational lens--that is, through a lens that understands regional or isthmus-wide patterns as part of broader processes produced by various nations and forces simultaneously. Fundamental to the course is also the analysis of how and why different people identify nationally or regionally with one place or another, how that changes through experiences of war, exile, revolution, and migration, and what that tells us about nations versus other types of territorial and cultural creations. Historical actors who tend to link their identity to territorialities other than the nation, such as the Miskitu of Nicaragua and Honduras; the Garifuna of Belize and Guatemala; the Maya of Guatemala and Belize; and a variety of immigrants, exiles, filibusterers, members of the military and fugitives from law, violence and economic pressures are also central topics of study.  More than merely highlighting the way Central America has vacillated between status as a republic, as nation-states, as kingdoms or as enclaves, this course aims to look at Central America's connections with the world in a much more multidirectional way: how it has connected to the Black Lives Matter movement, what particular kind of art comes out of experiences of genocide, how environmental disaster affects identity and class, how tourism affects historical knowledge and political policies, what kinds of communities are produced by deportation and how everyone of us is implicated in all of these questions.  

 

HILA 4501:   Latin America in Migration: Health, Culture, Rights        Lean Sweeney

Department:     History

Day and Time:  Tuesday, 3:30-6:00pm

This seminar examines diverse aspects of migration, inside Latin America and in its diaspora, including migrants’ interaction with law, crime, asylum and human rights claims; migrant health concerns; and cultures of migration, such as historical migration routes and their implications for cultural identity and traditions, the cultural positioning of caravans, and art and literature produced on the theme of migration, exiles and refugeeism.  Students are expected to focus on both primary and secondary sources, from a diversity of genres (court cases, testimonials, Facebook pages, etc).  50% of the final grade will be based on the research paper, including: a preliminary list of sources; an annotated bibliography; a first draft; and a final draft.  Students will also be asked to hand in a short journal and engage in some kind of project aimed at sharing their work outside of class.  25% of the grade will be on class discussion, participation, and peer-editing. 

 

PORT 3010:  Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition           Lilian Feitosa

Department:     Portuguese

Day and Time:   M/W/F 12:00-12:50pm

POTR 4270:  The Civilization of Brazil                                                        Eli Carter

Department:     Portuguese

Day and Time:   M/W 2:00-3:15pm

 

SPAN 3020-001:    Grammar and Composition II- Writing for Social Justice and Change        Esther Poveda

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:          

Have you ever wondered what kinds of change could you enact with more proficient Spanish writing skills? In this section of SPAN 3020, you will have the opportunity to grapple with advanced grammatical and writing skills while you read and discuss selected works by representative Latin American authors that have used writing as a tool for social justice and change, and by participating in a community engagement project with the UVA Equity Center and Madison House Albemarle High School Tutoring Program. In this course, in addition to completing 15-18 hours of volunteer work, you will deliberately use advanced grammatical forms to construct meaning and will produce texts in which grammar and meaning interact to lead to effective writing in Spanish.

SPAN 3420:   Latin American Literature I                                                     Allison Bigelow

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:           T/Th 9:30-10:45AM

¿Qué es la literatura colonial en América, la así llamada cuarta parte del mundo? En este curso introductorio, analizaremos la diversidad literaria y cultural de la época colonial a través de conversaciones en la sala de clase y trabajos escritos. Las metas del curso abordan la explicación de textos literarios con ideas creativas y vocabulario critico y la colaboración con sus compañeras y compañeros en los trabajos orales y escritos.

SPAN 3430:   Survey of Latin American Literature II                                  Charlotte Rogers

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:           T/Th 3:30-4:45pm

SPAN 3430:   Survey of Latin American Literature II                                  Cole Rizki

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:           T/Th 3:30-4:45pm

SPAN 4500:  Literature indigena                                                                 Allison Bigelow

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:           T/Th 12:00-1:15pm

¿Cuáles son las técnicas narrativas y conceptos fundamentales de la literatura indígena de América? ¿Cómo cambió esta tradición narrativa después del encuentro de los pueblos americanos, africanos, asiáticos y europeos? Con fines de entender la complejidad y la riqueza cultura-epistemológica de la literatura indígena, analizaremos textos indígenas pre-colombinos, de la época colonial y contemporáneos escritos en la región de Abya Yala (es decir, América Latina), con un énfasis mayor en la representación de la comida. Los textos incluyen obras escritas sin palabras (tradiciones orales, khipus, pinturas, códices), obras escritas en letras alfabéticas y películas.

SPAN 4520:  Contemporary Peruvian Culture                                              Jorge Secada

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:           M/W 2:00-3:15pm

This course examines literature, film, artwork, and other cultural production from Latin America’s major revolutions of the twentieth century. It will focus on the social revolutions of Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua, as well as social movements in Guatemala, Chile, and Venezuela. We will use cultural production as a lens to consider why these revolutions occurred, how they transformed economic, social, and cultural relations, how they were accompanied by transformations in artistic form, and in what ways these revolutions both inspired and disappointed the people most affected by them. The course content will include a wide array of artistic media including poetry, murals, photography, testimonies, music, and novels

SPAN 4520:  Latin American Revolutions                                                       Anne Garland Mahler

Department:      Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:           M/W 2:00-3:15pm

This course examines literature, film, artwork, and other cultural production from Latin America’s major revolutions of the twentieth century. It will focus on the social revolutions of Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua, as well as social movements in Guatemala, Chile, and Venezuela. We will use cultural production as a lens to consider why these revolutions occurred, how they transformed economic, social, and cultural relations, how they were accompanied by transformations in artistic form, and in what ways these revolutions both inspired and disappointed the people most affected by them. The course content will include a wide array of artistic media including poetry, murals, photography, testimonies, music, and novels.

SPAN 4319:  Borges                                                                                              Gustavo Pellón

Department: Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:  M/W/F 12:00-12:50pm

Description Este curso se propone estudiar la obra de Jorge Luis Borges con énfasis en sus cuentos, sin excluir algunos ensayos y poemas.   El curso examinará la obra de Borges desde la perspectiva de la literatura comparada y a Borges como lector y escritor de literatura mundial.

SPAN 4710: Latin American Culture and Civilization                                 Fernando Operé

Department: Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

Day/Time:  M 5:00-6:15pm

In this course of Travelers and Frontiers in Latin America. We will study diaries and accounts of the travelers that shape the idea that Europe had of America.  What did they see? What did they want to see? How did they describe it? What frontiers they crossed? What influence did their accounts have in the construction of continental imaginary? We will start with text by Christopher Columbus, the expeditions of Cortés to Tenochtitlan, Cabeza de Vaca in North America, Núñez de Pineda y Bascuñán in Chile, and other travelers in 17th, 18th and 19th Century: Humboldt, Darwin, Lewis ad Clark and others. We will continue with some travelers in the 20th Century: the transformative trip of Ernesto Che Guevara and Pablo Neruda. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement

 

Date: 
Friday, October 20, 2017