Courses

Fri, 2017-10-20 09:29 -- tas3y

Latin American Studies

Fall 2018 Courses

NOTE: Courses listed here or in the Undergraduate Record will count towards a Latin American Studies major or minor. Prior approval for other course work must be granted before the course is taken. For approval, please contact the Director of the Latin American Studies program, Thomas Klubock at tmk5k@virginia.edu. Please be sure to include a copy of the syllabus.

 

AMST 2559-001: History of Abolition in the Americas, Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am, Prof. Daut

History of Abolition in the Americas: This course will introduce students to the long history of attempts to abolish chattel slavery in the Americas. By reading primary documents that include speeches, newspaper articles, novels, poetry, and religious tracts, we will examine the rise of abolitionist movements in Great Britain, France, the Caribbean, and the United States. In many respects, transatlantic abolitionists invented the modern concept of human rights, an ideological tool indispensable to all of our social justice movements in the present, but laden with its own ethical and social complications. By looking at abolition as a global phenomenon that extended well beyond the geographical borders of the United States, we will discover a whole range of new events and actors in one of human history’s most compelling and disturbing dramas. By covering issues ranging from gradual emancipation in New England in the late eighteenth century, to the abolition of slavery in the French Caribbean in 1794, to its reinstatement in 1802, to the end of the US Civil War in 1865, to the legal abolition of slavery in Cuba and Brazil in the 1880s, we will examine the origins and ideological underpinnings of antislavery and abolitionist movements across the Atlantic World. In so doing, we will pay special attention to the different methods by which abolitionists in the Atlantic World defined the goals of anti-slavery activism, as well as the various meanings of liberty and independence produced within their discourses

AMST 3559-001: Introduction to Digital Caribbean Studies, Tu 2:00-4:30pm, Prof. Daut

Introduction to Digital Caribbean Studies--Increasingly, we access, share, and create information in digital forms, and this has been referred to as a digital revolution. But how does — or how should — this revolution in the way we teach, learn, and conduct research also change the way we do scholarly work in the classroom? The digital humanities investigates how new media and digital tools are changing the way we produce knowledge in the humanities, by enabling us to share not only information, but sound, visualizations, and even performances using new platforms. This class will provide an introduction to some of these formats and tools, along with immediate critical reflection and discussion about their value to the academy. Since information technology has become one of the key ways in which the peoples of the Caribbean and its diasporas both communicate with one another and gain access to global conversations, alongside this exploration of digital tools, in general, this class will likewise study how the internet can help people in marginalized spaces to engage with crucial social problems and to express their political ideals and aspirations. As the creators of the Digital Caribbean website have attested, “the Internet is analogous in important ways to the Caribbean itself as dynamic and fluid cultural space: it is generated from disparate places and by disparate peoples; it challenges fundamentally the geographical and physical barriers that disrupt or disallow connection; and it places others in relentless relation.” This class will therefore both introduce students to the digital humanities and to the Caribbean as an apt space for exploring the potential of the internet to confront and disrupt many of the more traditional structures of dominance that have traditionally silenced marginalized voices.

ANTH 3152: Amazonian Peoples, M/W 2:00-3:15pm, Prof. Mentore

HILA 2559: History of Indigenous Rights in the Americas, T/TH, 9:30-10:45am, Prof. McGrath

This is a lecture course designed to introduce students to the study of indigenous history and Latin America since independence. Where did the vibrant indigenous rights movements that are changing the face of Latin America come from? In this course we will trace the long history of indigenous communities demanding rights from the state and from international organizations over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the cases of Colombia, Bolivia, and Chile using primary and secondary sources in English. Students will be expected to attend lecture, complete weekly reading assignments, and participate in short discussions with the class. Written assignments for this class will include two short midterms (essay and key word identification) and a final exam. Weekly readings may include selections from the following books:

Yashar, Deborah J. Contesting Citizenship in Latin America: The Rise of Indigenous Movements and the Postliberal Challenge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Hylton, Forrest, and Sinclair Thomson. Revolutionary Horizons: Past and Present in Bolivian Politics. London: Verso, 2007.

Mallon, Florencia E. Courage Tastes of Blood: The Mapuche Community of Nicolás Ailío and the Chilean State, 1906–2001. Durham: Duke University Press, 2005.

Postero, Nancy. The Indigenous State. University of California Press, 2017. http://www.luminosoa.org/site/books/10.1525/luminos.31/

HILA 1501: Race, Sex, and the Cold War in Latin America, T, 6:00-8:30pm, Prof. McGrath

Wasn’t the Cold War something the US and the USSR fought over? What does it have to do with Latin America, race, and sex? This class explores how this global conflict was in fact not “cold” at all, as Latin American social movements, revolutionaries, and states fought over the definition of citizenship and political and cultural belonging. Each week, students will read and discuss books and articles that examine the global 1950s to the 1990s from the perspective of Latin America. Topics will include the Cuban Revolution, the global youth rebellions of the 1960s, political violence, human rights movements, and the emergence of feminist, indigenous rights, LGBT rights, and anti-racist movements. We will also be watching movies, listening to music, and exploring art and literature from this period. This is an introductory history seminar where students will read primary and secondary texts and conduct archival research for a project of their choice. There are no exams, but students will be expected to complete semi-weekly reading journals and a final research project of 12-15 pages.

Readings may include selections from:

Dubinsky, Karen, Catherine Krull, Susan Lord, Sean Mills, and Scott Rutherford, eds. New World Coming: The Sixties and the Shaping of Global Consciousness. Toronto: Between the Lines, 2009.

Joseph, G. M, and Daniela Spenser, eds. In from the Cold: Latin America’s New Encounter with the Cold War. Durham: Duke University Press, 2008.

Green, James Naylor. Beyond Carnival: Male Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century Brazil. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Chase, Michelle. Revolution within the Revolution: Women and Gender Politics in Cuba, 1952-1962. The University of North Carolina Press, 2015.

Cowan, Benjamin Arthur. “How Machismo Got Its Spurs—in English: Social Science, Cold War Imperialism, and the Ethnicization of Hypermasculinity.” Latin American Research Review 52, no. 4 (October 23, 2017): 606–22.

Hale, Charles R. “Between Che Guevara and the Pachamama: Mestizos, Indians and Identity Politics in   the Anti-Quincentenary Campaign.” Critique of Anthropology 14, no. 1 (March 1, 1994): 9–39.

HILA 1501: The Conquest of America, W 1:00-3:15pm, Prof. Klubock

HILA 2001: Colonial Latin America, 1500-1824, M/W 11:00-11:50, Prof. Klubock

HILA 2559: History of Indigenous Rights in the Americas, T/TH, 9:30-10:45am, Prof. McGrath

This is a lecture course designed to introduce students to the study of indigenous history and Latin America since independence. Where did the vibrant indigenous rights movements that are changing the face of Latin America come from? In this course we will trace the long history of indigenous communities demanding rights from the state and from international organizations over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the cases of Colombia, Bolivia, and Chile using primary and secondary sources in English. Students will be expected to attend lecture, complete weekly reading assignments, and participate in short discussions with the class. Written assignments for this class will include two short midterms (essay and key word identification) and a final exam. Weekly readings may include selections from the following books:

Yashar, Deborah J. Contesting Citizenship in Latin America: The Rise of Indigenous Movements and the Postliberal Challenge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Hylton, Forrest, and Sinclair Thomson. Revolutionary Horizons: Past and Present in Bolivian Politics. London: Verso, 2007.

Mallon, Florencia E. Courage Tastes of Blood: The Mapuche Community of Nicolás Ailío and the Chilean State, 1906–2001. Durham: Duke University Press, 2005.

Postero, Nancy. The Indigenous State. University of California Press, 2017. http://www.luminosoa.org/site/books/10.1525/luminos.31/

 

KICH 1010: Introduction to Maya K'iche' I, T/TH 4:00-5:15pm, Prof. Poveda

 

KICH 2010 - Intermediate Maya K'iche' I, T/TH 2:00-315PM, Prof. Poveda

 

POTR 4260: Brazilian Media, M/W 2:00-3:15, Mr. Carter

The objective of this course is to examine the development of Brazilian audiovisual media from the 1950s to present-day broadcast television, Pay-TV, and Internet content. To this end, through the lens of important theoretical concepts and critical debates, the course will focus on key policies and players, formats, different modes of production, and financing mechanisms. Much of our discussion and analysis will revolve around a selection of contemporary works (from television and the Internet) that, in contrast to the traditionally dominant telenovela, have emerged as a result of Brazilian media’s slow transition out of the network era and into one characterized by technological advancements and increased viewing options.

SPAN 3400-001: Latin American Literature II, Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm, Prof. Mahler

Spanish 3430 provides students with a survey of Latin American literature and the context in which it has developed from 1900 to the present. Students will leave this course with a general understanding of the region’s major literary trends, including their social and political dimensions. “Literature,” in this course, refers to literary texts (novels, stories, essays, poems), as well as visual art, films, and song lyrics. Throughout the course, we will consider the following questions: How has Latin America’s cultural production shaped and been shaped by its cultures, peoples, and historical events? How do the consciousness, memory, and imagination expressed within the region’s literature both reflect and create the region’s realities? And perhaps most importantly, who has (and has not) had access to Latin America’s literature and how has that shaped the way the region has represented itself through both the written word and image?

SPAN 3420: Survey of Latin American Literature II, M/W, TBD, Prof. Operé

This is a survey course of Latin American Literature to introduce students to the major authors, and literary movements of Latin American literature from the discovery in 1492 up to 1900.  Students will read and discuss selections of works from accounts of the conquest, colonial period and 19th century, studying its historical and literary importance. Some authors include: Columbus, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, José María de Heredia, Esteban Echeverría, Ricardo Palma, José Martí y Rubén Dario among others.

SPAN 4520-001, Spain, the Pacific, and Asia, T/TH, 11:00-12:15pm, Prof. Padrón

Cristóbal Colón navegó hacia el oeste intentando llegar al Oriente, pero se topó con un Nuevo Mundo. Aunque muchos españoles se dedicaron a aprovechar las oportunidades presentadas por este descubrimiento, otros seguían interesados en hallar una ruta que atravesara o diera la vuelta al continente americano y así llegará a las Indias que Colón había querido alcanzar.  El esfuerzo culminó en la conquista de las Islas Filipinas en 1565-70, la cual dio lugar a una nueva fase imperialista orientada hacia la China, Japón, y otros sitios asiáticos. Este curso sirve como introducción a esta dimensión tan poco conocida del expansionismo español, usando textos de la época junto con fuentes secundarias modernas.  El tema nos permite reflexionar sobre las dimensiones globales de la cultura temprana moderna españolaA

 Pre-requisito: un curso “survey” en el program de español.  Este curso cuenta como un curso de cultura & civilización para los propósitos de la especialización en español.  

SPAN 4711: 1492 and the Aftermath, T/TH, 2:00-3:15pm, Prof. Padrón

En este curso nos acercaremos a la historia del encuentro entre España y el Nuevo Mundo que empezó con el viaje de Cristóbal Colón en 1492 mediante los relatos de los participantes mismos, o de otro escritores del mismo período.  Nuestro propósito no será la mera reconstrucción de la realidad histórica a través de estos textos necesariamente parciales, sino también el análisis de las maneras en que la cultura y la ideología inevitablemente dan forma y sentido al relato histórico.  Leeremos textos escritos por españoles junto con otros elaborados por mestizos

 

 

 

Date: 
Friday, October 20, 2017